Dental Visits

Dental Visit
Dental Visit
Regular dental visits are essential for maintaining good oral health. Yet, millions of adults experience sufficient anxiety at the thought of an upcoming dental visit that they needless to worry about, postpone, or avoid seeing their dentist.
If, like most people, you experience some degree of anxiety when it comes to seeing your dentist, the following suggestions can help you…

Dental Visits

Regular dental visits are essential for maintaining good oral health. Yet, millions of adults experience sufficient anxiety at the thought of an upcoming dental visit that they needless to worry about, postpone, or avoid seeing their dentist.

If, like most people, you experience some degree of anxiety when it comes to seeing your dentist, the following suggestions can help you to relax before and during the dental treatment.

What’s important is to recognize your anxiety, accept it as a common reaction to an uncertain situation and learn to master it.

These recommendations will help you to comfortably accept dental visits and in turn, boost both your confidence and oral health.

Share your feelings with your dentist. Let him know that you are fearful, tense or anxious so that he can tailor his treatment and his pace to your needs. By bringing your fears out into the open, you will gain control of him, relax and receive more effective, pain-free treatment.

Set aside a stress-free time for your dental visit – a time when you won’t be rushed, physically strained or troubled by other concerns.

Keep in mind that when you see your dentist on a regular basis, many dental visits rarely involve more than a professional cleaning, examination and/or consultation. You might also have a close friend or family member (one who has a positive attitude toward dental care) accompany you to your appointment if it makes you feel more at ease.

Try to identify your specific fears and concerns. Some people feel anxiety because they had or heard about a negative dental experience during childhood.

Get a good night’s sleep the day before and eat a light breakfast the day of your appointment.

If you are feeling any discomfort during treatment, you can motion the dentist to stop through a prearranged signal – by raising your hand, blinking, sharply, or nodding, for example.

During the dental visit practice distraction and relaxation techniques to take your mind off the treatment so as to reduce tension.

Ask the dentist to explain each step of the dental examination or procedure before hand if needed.

Once the dental visit is over praise yourself for a well done job. And remember, the dentist-patient relationship mutually involves you and your dentist.

Overcome the habit of thinking of yourself as the passive recipient of treatment. Your dentist will welcome your taking an active role in your dental care.

You’ll be glad you did it and you’ll come away smiling.

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